Author Topic: performance of Culver  (Read 6537 times)

Woody

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performance of Culver
« on: January 13, 2012, 11:53:41 AM »
Depending on your engine, please give a little info on performance of your plane if now flying.  Stall speed, spin recovery and speed at recovery.  Rotation speed and over the fence and cruise speed.
I know this depends on your prop also. 
« Last Edit: January 13, 2012, 11:55:22 AM by Woody »

Bill Poynter

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2012, 02:00:00 PM »
Hi Woody

My present Cadet usually indicates 120-125 MPH at around 2300 RPM.  I've had the airspeed indicator overhauled. but I'm sure there are a lot of installation variations between different Cadets.  My plane also has a current pitot-static certification.  It's a C85 with a metal McCauley model 1B90 CM7051 prop.  This prop doesn't turn up as many RPM's during climb as I thought it would.  I usually come over the fence at about 70 MPH if it isn't too gusty.  If it is gusty, more like 80. 
Here's a link to some specs posted on Gene Hetsel's website: http://www.ibeatyouthere.com/culver/specs.html

Paul Rule

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2012, 11:03:46 PM »
Over 1519 NM (11 legs) I averaged 88 NM (101 stat mi.) per hr. and almost exactly 20 stat miles per gallon of gas.  This was with a Franklin 90 HP and a 70-54" wood prop.   These include all manouvering in the pattern so will be a little slower then straight line time -vs- distance measurments.

Woody

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #3 on: February 23, 2012, 12:50:29 PM »
I used to experiment with props on a formula one and it was interesting with a C-100.  Now I'm wondering about increasing the pitch on a prop for more speed.  some mfg. co only look at the charts and that is what you get.  I'm looking at what a 7058 would do.  I know it would not be certified but would only be a test for results.   Any input for the Franklin 90?

Bill Poynter

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2012, 04:27:52 PM »
I think it would be a good idea to see what the manifold pressure is when running a 70X54 at cruising airspeed and RPM, before ordering a prop with a bigger pitch.  You might also consider a 68" diameter prop if you're going to increase the pitch.   

Tim Lunceford

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2012, 06:24:49 PM »
I have a Sensenich 7258 on a Franklin 90 powered Cadet.   I would not recommend it as it is rather slow to accererate and the climb suffers.  I fly by myself most of the time so live with it.  After leveling off I cruise at 2500 rpm and 25 inches.  I consider this airplane heavy at 935lbs which dosn't help.   Tim

Woody

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2012, 06:33:43 PM »
Nice to know Tim.  I'm wondering if cutting to 70" might help a bit?  Some charts do not recommend more than 70" length.  Now thinking of 69x56 or 70x56 pitch.    Anyone ever tried these?  Compromise with safety is the key.

Bill Poynter

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Re: performance of Culver
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2012, 07:41:00 PM »
Comparing the performance of different prop pitches is only useful when you are comparing props from a single manufacturer.  I've been told by one prop manufacturer that pitch numbers aren't necessarily calculated the same way at all companies.  I'm guessing it has something to do with the airfoil used on the prop.  Pooling the results that we've experienced is a good way for us to benefit from this forum.  Finding a used prop to fit a Cadet is almost impossible.  Buying a new one and having it turn out to be unsatisfactory is a pretty expensive foul-up.